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West Papua Report June 2014

June 4, 2014

West Papua Report
June 2014

This is the 122nd in a series of monthly reports that focus on developments affecting Papuans. This series is produced by the non-profit West Papua Advocacy Team (WPAT) drawing on media accounts, other NGO assessments, and analysis and reporting from sources within West Papua. This report is co-published by the East Timor and Indonesia Action Network (ETAN). Back issues are posted online at edmcw. If you wish to receive the report directly via e-mail, send a note to etan. Link to this issue: http://etan.org/issues/wpapua/2014/1405wpap.htm.

The Report leads with "Perspective," an analysis piece; followed by "Update," a summary of some developments during the covered period; and then "Chronicle" which includes analyses, statements, new resources, appeals and action alerts related to West Papua. Anyone interested in contributing a Perspective or responding to one should write to edmcw. The opinions expressed in Perspectives are the author’s and not necessarily those of WPAT or ETAN.For additional news on West Papua see the reg.westpapua listserv archive or on Twitter.

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West Papua Report
June 2014

This is the 122nd in a series of monthly reports that focus on developments affecting Papuans. This series is produced by the non-profit West Papua Advocacy Team (WPAT) drawing on media accounts, other NGO assessments, and analysis and reporting from sources within West Papua. This report is co-published by the East Timor and Indonesia Action Network (ETAN). Back issues are posted online at edmcw. If you wish to receive the report directly via e-mail, send a note to etan. Link to this issue: http://etan.org/issues/wpapua/2014/1406wpap.htm.

The Report leads with "Perspective," an analysis piece; followed by "Update," a summary of some developments during the covered period; and then "Chronicle" which includes analyses, statements, new resources, appeals and action alerts related to West Papua. Anyone interested in contributing a Perspective or responding to one should write to edmcw. The opinions expressed in Perspectives are the author’s and not necessarily those of WPAT or ETAN. For additional news on West Papua see the reg.westpapua listserv archive or on Twitter.

CONTENTS

This edition’s PERSPECTIVE by renowned human rights campaigner Carmel Budiardjo provides a succinct overview of the history of Indonesian repression of West Papua and includes a focus on the special challenges facing Papuan women.

UPDATE highlights the intention of the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission to focus on the plight of indigenous peoples, notably in West Papua. The Asian Human Rights Commission draws attention to police shooting of three Papuans in Nabire. The online activist network "Anonymous" has announced that it will focus on the plight of Papuans. A Pacific regional UN forum on decolonization was urged to consider the situation in West Papua. Indonesian President Yudhoyono’s planned visit to Fiji illustrates Jakarta’s efforts to undercut the broad appeal of the Papuan cause in the region. Religious activists are focusing on the exploitation of workers and their families by the oil palm plantation run by Sinar Mas. A New Zealand police training program in West Papua has been cancelled. The Australian government is urged to mitigate culpability for rights violations abroad.

CHRONICLE highlights "West Papua: No-One’s Colony" by the Pacific Network on Globalization and May 14 comments before the UN by Julianus Septer Manufandu, of the Papua Customary Council. A new illustrated, interactive eBook tells Papuan stories. Australian TV journalist broadcasts program on human rights in West Papua.

PERSPECTIVE

WEST PAPUA: Poverty and Discrimination in The Land of Papua
by Carmel Budiardjo*

When Indonesia, a former Dutch colony, gained its independence after the Second World War, one disputed area was Irian Jaya, now called West Papua, a vast, richly-endowed territory bordering on Papua New Guinea.

Eventually, negotiations on the future of Irian Jaya were held in New York in 1963 when the Papuan people were granted the right to a so-called ‘Act of Free Choice.’ The U.S. government was deeply involved in these talks because the U.S. mining corporation, Freeport McMoRan, was well aware of the abundant natural resources in the territory. While the former colonial power, the U.S. and Indonesia attended these talks, the Papuan people whose interests were at were at stake were not represented.

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